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LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Early Alzheimer’s

Posted by on Oct 1, 2019 in Brain Training for Seniors | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Early Alzheimer’s

LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Early Alzheimer’s

Multidisciplinary Intervention Creates Neural Changes and Improvements in Cognition and Daily Function in Early Alzheimer’s:

Study Shows Adaptation of Bredesen Protocol Promising in Slowing Clinical Cognitive Decline

September 13, 2019 – The results of our study just published in the Open BioMedical (OBM) journal Integrative and Complementary Medicine highlight the benefits of a functional medicine approach to slowing cognitive decline in adults over age 55 with clinical cognitive impairment including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers examined changes in cognitive skills, brain connectivity, and daily functioning following a multifaceted anti-neuroinflammatory intervention that included physical exercise, mental exercise, a grain-free/sugar-free diet, anti-inflammatory nutritional supplements, sleep optimization, and stress management within the context of a functional medicine practice for five patients with varying levels of cognitive impairment.  (more…)

LearningRx Research Bibliography

Posted by on Sep 22, 2019 in Brain Training for ADHD, Brain Training for Children & Adolescents, Brain Training for Seniors, Brain Training for TBI | Comments Off on LearningRx Research Bibliography

LearningRx Brain Training Research Studies

Here is the most recent bibliography of LearningRx research:

Carpenter, D., Ledbetter, C., & Moore, A.L. (2016). LearningRx cognitive training effects in children ages 8-14: A randomized controlled study. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30(5), 815-826. doi: 10.1002/acp.3257. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acp.3257

Gibson, K., Carpenter, D.M., Moore, A.L., & Mitchell, T. (2015). Training the brain to learn: Beyond vision therapy. Vision Development and Rehabilitation, 1(2), 120-129. Retrieved from https://www.covd.org/page/VDR_1_2

Hill, O.W., Zewelanji, S., & Faison, O. (2016). The Efficacy of the LearningRx Cognitive Training Program: Modality and Transfer Effects. Journal of Experimental Education: Learning, Instruction, and Cognition, 84(3), 600-620. doi: 10.1080/00220973.2015.1065218.

Jedlicka, E. (2017). LearningRx cognitive training for children and adolescents ages 5-18: Effects on academic skills, behavior, and cognition. Frontiers in Education, 2(62). doi: 10.3389/feduc.2017.00062. Retrieved from https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/feduc.2017.00062/full  

(more…)

LearningRx Research: A Review of Brain Training for ADHD

Posted by on Sep 5, 2019 in Brain Training for ADHD | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: A Review of Brain Training for ADHD

Humans Are Better than Computers at Delivering Brain Training to Children with ADHD
Researchers Explain How Clinician-Delivered Brain Training is More Beneficial than Computer Brain Games for Remediating Multiple Cognitive and Social-Emotional Struggles Frequently Associated with ADHD

July 29, 2019 – Not only do children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently struggle with memory and speed of information processing, they also navigate deficits in social cognition and self-esteem. Mainstream approaches to treating ADHD such as central nervous system stimulants and behavioral therapy do not adequately address these struggles. Although several companies market computerized brain training software for children with ADHD, these games also fall short in remediating the multiple cognitive and emotional deficits found in ADHD.

In a review of ADHD intervention research published in the latest issue of the Journal of Mental Health and Clinical Psychology, we suggest that humans—not computers—are best suited for delivering brain training to children diagnosed with ADHD.  (more…)

Can Brain Training Improve ACT Scores?

Posted by on Jun 19, 2019 in Brain Training for Children & Adolescents | Comments Off on Can Brain Training Improve ACT Scores?

Open Letter to College Admission Offices:

The Contribution of Cognitive Training to Improved College Entrance Exam Performance

Research has shown us again and again that cognitive skills correlate with standardized math and language arts test scores, and that IQ scores are significant predictors of performance on college entrance exams. Thus, it is not only plausible but probable that strengthening the individual cognitive skills that comprise the composite IQ score can contribute to increased performance on standardized tests. Cognitive skill deficits—especially deficits in working memory, processing speed, and executive functions—are common among struggling students. Because cognitive skills are significant predictors of academic performance, interventions that remediate cognitive deficits are critical to maximizing a student’s academic success.

Cognitive training programs like those offered at LearningRx brain training centers are a prime example of how an intervention can target and remediate weak cognitive skills through repeated engagement in intense mental tasks. By isolating weaknesses in cognition and exposing a student to concentrated remediation exercises targeting those weak skills, cognitive training can improve not only the trained skills but related ones as well. Unlike tutoring, cognitive training does not re-teach content but, instead, enhances the individual underlying learning skills such as working memory, long-term memory, processing speed, reasoning, attention, and visual and auditory processing—all skills that contribute to an individual’s ability to think and learn efficiently.

What evidence do we have that cognitive training can help improve achievement test scores?

(more…)

LearningRx Research: One-on-One Brain Training Improves Cognition and Daily Functioning for Adults over Age 50

Posted by on Feb 11, 2019 in Brain Training for Seniors, Uncategorized | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: One-on-One Brain Training Improves Cognition and Daily Functioning for Adults over Age 50

New Research Shows LearningRx Cognitive Training Provides Hope for Older Adults with Memory Problems

February 8, 2019 – The results of our study just published in the APA journal Psychology and Neuroscience highlight the benefits of human-delivered brain training for adults over age 50, including better cognition as well as improved mood and life skills. In the study with 292 adults between the ages of 50 and 94 with memory or attention problems, researchers found statistically significant changes in long-term memory, processing speed, auditory processing, fluid reasoning, working memory, and visual processing for both treatment groups following 79 hours of one-on-one cognitive training. In addition, they noted improvements in mood, including bolstered confidence, hope, perseverance, reduced anxiety, and overall outlook. Participants also reported changes in work performance, hobbies and sports, driving, and managing daily responsibilities. (more…)

LearningRx Research: Two Methods of Delivering ThinkRx for Children

Posted by on Sep 24, 2018 in Brain Training for Children & Adolescents, Uncategorized | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: Two Methods of Delivering ThinkRx for Children

Moore, A.L., Carpenter, D.M., Miller, T.M., & Ledbetter, C., (2019). Comparing Two Methods of Delivering ThinkRx Cognitive Training to Children Ages 8-14: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Equivalency. Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, 3(3), 261-270 . doi.org/10.1007/s41465-018-0094-z
In a randomized controlled trial assessing equivalence of parallel groups of children ages 8-14, we compared cognitive outcomes between a group who received 60 hours of ThinkRx cognitive training delivered one-on-one by a clinician (n = 20) versus a group of children who received 30 hours of ThinkRx delivered by a clinician and the remaining 30 hours through supervised digital training procedures in a computer lab (n = 18). Results showed no significant differences between groups on tests of working memory, logic and reasoning, auditory processing, visual processing, processing speed, or overall IQ score. Results were significantly different on the test of long-term memory. These results suggest that both delivery models are equivalent cognitive training interventions for children. Read the article (Link to results poster)

LearningRx Research: MCI Study Presented at 2018 APA Convention

Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Brain Training for Seniors | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: MCI Study Presented at 2018 APA Convention

MRI and Neuropsychological Outcomes following a Functional Medicine Intervention with Cognitive Training in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): A Multiple Case Study. 

August 31, 2018 — The preliminary results of our MCI study were presented at the 2018 American Psychological Association Annual Conference in San Francisco.  Using a multiple case study design, we examined neural connectivity with fMRI, executive function, memory, attention, reasoning, everyday functioning, and overall IQ score for 5 clients with varying levels of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) before the intervention, after 12 weeks on functional medicine (FM) protocols (grain-free/sugar-free diet, nutritional supplements, aerobic activity, optimized sleep & stress reduction) without cognitive training, and again following the addition and completion of 72 hours of cognitive training. In all five cases, improvement in both cognitive and life skills was achieved with a functional medicine protocol that included cognitive training. Normalization of the Default Mode Network (DMN) was evident along with the appearance of anti-correlations and decreased hyperconnectivity. A multidisciplinary approach to slowing or reversing cognitive decline appears to be promising. Link to presentation

Reference: Moore, A.L., James, R., Carpenter, D., Miller, T., & Ledbetter, C. (2018). MRI and Neuropsychological Outcomes following a Functional Medicine Intervention with Cognitive Training in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): A Multiple Case Study. Presentation at American Psychological Association Annual Convention, August 2018, San Francisco, CA.

LearningRx Research: Brain Training for ADHD

Posted by on Jun 26, 2018 in Brain Training for ADHD, Brain Training for Children & Adolescents | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: Brain Training for ADHD

In a randomized controlled trial, children with ADHD who completed 60 hours of ThinkRx cognitive training realized significant clinical cognitive change AND behavioral improvements.  The study, “Clinician-delivered cognitive training for children with attention problems: Transfer effects on cognitive and behavior from the ThinkRx randomized controlled trial,” was just published in the journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. 
(more…)

LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Children with Learning Struggles

Posted by on Jun 22, 2018 in Brain Training for ADHD, Brain Training for Children & Adolescents | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Children with Learning Struggles

Here’s a selection of research studies on LearningRx brain training for children and adolescents with learning struggles:

Carpenter, D., Ledbetter, C., & Moore, A.L. (2016). LearningRx cognitive training effects in children ages 8-14: A randomized controlled study. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30(5), 815-826. doi: 10.1002/acp.3257
In a randomized controlled study, the effects of a one-on-one cognitive training program on IQ, memory, visual and auditory processing, processing speed, reasoning, and attention for students ages 8-14 were examined. Participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group to complete 60 hours of cognitive training or to a wait-list control group. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in general intelligence and individual cognitive skills after completing cognitive training with ThinkRx, a LearningRx program. Results showed statistically significant differences between groups on all outcome measures except for attention. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are examined. Link to article: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acp.3257/full

 

Jedlicka, E. (2017). LearningRx cognitive training for children and adolescents ages 5-18: Effects on academic skills, behavior, and cognition. Frontiers in Education, 2(62). doi: 10.3389/feduc.2017.00062
This study with 178 students ages 5-18 investigated whether ThinkRx and ReadRx clinician-delivered cognitive training programs reduced academic difficulties and oppositional behavior for school-age children with learning struggles compared to a control group.  Results indicated there were statistically significant differences overall between the intervention groups and the control group on all measures of academic difficulties. Both intervention groups saw a reduction in academic difficulty ratings following training while the control group saw an increase in academic difficulty during a comparable time interval.  Both intervention groups achieved statistically significant changes on objective cognitive test measures as well. Link to article: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/feduc.2017.00062/full

 

Hill, O.W., Zewelanji, S., & Faison, O. (2016). The Efficacy of the LearningRx Cognitive Training Program: Modality and Transfer Effects. Journal of Experimental Education: Learning, Instruction, and Cognition, 84(3), 600-620. doi: 10.1080/00220973.2015.1065218.
This article describes two trials testing the efficacy of the LearningRx one-on-one cognitive training program and its computer-based version (Brainskills) in laboratory and school settings. Study 1 tested Brainskills in a laboratory setting with 322 middle school students. Paired t-tests revealed significant gains on all cognitive measures and math performance after 3 weeks of training. Study 2, a randomized control study, included 225 high school students randomly assigned to one of three conditions: LearningRx, Brainskills, or study hall (control) in a school setting for a 15-week training period. Univariate ANCOVAs revealed significantly higher scores for the treatment groups compared with controls on working memory, logic and reasoning, and three of four math attitude measures. Funded by $3M National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. Link to abstract: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00220973.2015.1065218

 

Gibson, K., Carpenter, D.M., Moore, A.L., & Mitchell, T. (2015). Training the brain to learn: Beyond vision therapy. Vision Development and Rehabilitation, 1(2), 120-129.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the comprehensive cognitive training program, ThinkRx. Sixty-one children (ages 6-18) were given pretest and post-test cognitive assessments. Thirty-one students completed a 24-week cognitive training program in a LearningRx center. A matched control group of thirty children did not receive training. Multiple regression analyses indicated that treatment group membership was a statistically significant predictor of outcomes in long-term memory, logic and reasoning, working memory, processing speed, auditory processing, and Word Attack. The treatment group realized significantly greater gains in six of seven cognitive measures. Link to study: http://www.covd.org/?page=VDR_1_2

 

see all LearningRx research

LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Traumatic Brain Injury

Posted by on Jun 22, 2018 in Brain Training for TBI | Comments Off on LearningRx Research: Brain Training for Traumatic Brain Injury

Here’s a selection of research on LearningRx brain training for traumatic brain injury (TBI):

Ledbetter, C., Moore, A.L., Mitchell, T. (2017). Cognitive effects of ThinkRx cognitive rehabilitation training for eleven soldiers with brain injury: A retrospective chart review. Frontiers in Psychology, 8(825). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00825
The current study examined the cognitive outcomes following ThinkRx, a clinician-delivered cognitive rehabilitation training program for soldiers recovering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and acquired brain injury (ABI). In a retrospective chart review, we examined cognitive outcomes of 11 cases who had completed an average of 80 hours of ThinkRx cognitive rehabilitation training delivered by clinicians and supplemented with digital training exercises. Outcome measures included scores from six cognitive skill batteries on the Woodcock Johnson  III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Participants achieved gains in all cognitive skills tested and achieved statistically significant changes in long-term memory, processing speed, auditory processing, and fluid reasoning with very large effect sizes. Clinically significant changes in multiple cognitive skills were also noted across cases. Link to article: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00825/full

 

Ledbetter, C., & Moore, A. (2018). Neuroimaging outcomes of a cognitive rehabilitation training program. Journal of Neuroimaging, 28(2), 225-233. doi: 10.1111/jon.12507
To investigate if aberrant brain connectivity and changes in brain connectivity (a neuroimaging marker of neuroplasticity), were evident prior to and after completion of a robust cognitive training program, a series of case studies were carried out in subjects with varying degrees of traumatic brain injuries (n = 5) and cognitive impairment (n = 5). MR exams were acquired on all subjects prior to and upon completion of the ThinkRx cognitive training program. In addition to MR exams, all subjects completed pre-post neuropsychological testing (WJ-IV) and condition-specific rating scales. For all cases, neuropsychological testing and qualitative outcomes measures increased, supporting that the robustness of the training program held for each imaged case study. Normalization of DMN connectivity, including decreased hyperconnectivity and reoccurrence of anticorrelated activity, was evident in the most severe TBI case. At the group level, significant training-induced changes in neural connectivity were identified.  Read the article. Or read the abstract on pages 230-231:Neuroimaging Outcomes for TBI and MCI_J of Neuroimaging

 

Moore, A.L., & Ledbetter, C. (2018). MRI, qEEG, & neuropsychological outcomes following cognitive rehabilitation training for severe traumatic brain injury: A clinical case study. Presentation at Brain Injury Summit, Jan 2018, Vail, CO.
Using a single case design, we examined neural connectivity changes with fMRI, qEEG, and changes in IQ score, working memory, long-term memory, visual & auditory processing, processing speed, attention, reasoning, and everyday functioning following 60 hours of cognitive training 8 years after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury.  Neuropsychological testing results showed a 21-point increase in IQ score and significant gains in working memory, processing speed, logic and reasoning, and visual processing; as well as gains in long-term memory and auditory processing.  FMRI showed normalization of the Default Mode Network (DMN) with reappearance of anti-correlations, and decreased hyperconnectivity was evident post-training.  Post qEEG showed normalization of activity in the left frontal region which was previously abnormal.  Functional outcomes included improved motivation for life, better focus and problem-solving, improved mood, no deficits in daily living tasks, and a return to former high level career field. Link to presentation

 

Moore, A.L., Ledbetter, C., & Carpenter, D. (2017). MRI and neuropsychological outcomes following cognitive rehabilitation training in traumatic brain injury: A Multiple case study.  Presented at Society for Neuroscience, November 2017, Washington, DC.
Using a multiple case study design, we examined neural connectivity changes with fMRI and changes in IQ score, working memory, long-term memory, visual & auditory processing, processing speed, attention, reasoning, and everyday functioning following 60 hours of cognitive training for 5 clients with Traumatic Brain Injury.  Results from the Woodcock Johnson IV -Tests of Cognitive Abilities showed increases in IQ score for all cases (n = 5), with a mean increase of 21 points.  All cases achieved gains in long-term memory, processing speed, logic and reasoning, and auditory processing; and four of five cases gained on visual processing and working memory.  mTBI participants exhibited significant training-induced changes in neural connectivity. Normalization of the Default Mode Network (DMN) was evident in the severe TBI case along with the appearance of anti-correlations and decreased hyperconnectivity.  Link to presentation

see all LearningRx research